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Right to Recover ~ Winning the Political and Religious Wars Over Stem Cell Research in America presents scientific facts that challenge readers to think for themselves rather than accept political or religious views on stem cell research.

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This book is available by request in bookstores nationwide.


RIGHT TO RECOVER is an Award-Winning Finalist in the Current Events: Political/Social of the National Best Books 2007 Awards. Amazon Best-selling book in biomedical category.


Thursday, September 13, 2007

September 11 and a Complaint to the Biomedical Industry

Don Reed (www.stemcellbattles.com) would like to register a complaint about the entire biomedical industry. It goes something like this:

My name is Don Reed. I am the father of a paralyzed young man, Roman Reed, who inspired the Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act, which helped fund Dr. Hans Keirstead’s work, the first state-funded embryonic stem cell research in America. Thanks to the vision of people like Thomas O'karma, and biomedical corporations like Geron, there is a chance my son will one day walk again.

But today, I have a complaint to lodge.

The biomedical industry—is entirely too modest, too shy, and too bashful.

I am not joking in the slightest.

You have the greatest product imaginable, the realistic hope of cure. What could be more wonderful than that-- for the hundred million Americans who suffer from chronic illness?

Why do you not think of yourself as the equal of the United States Defense Department?

Consider: six years ago, on this day, September 11, approximately 3000 people died in the twin towers massacre. Since then we have spent more than three thousand American soldiers’ lives, and more than half a trillion dollars reacting to that crime, and tragedy.

And yet we lose four thousand Americans every day from chronic disease—that’s 9/11 every day—and how much do we spend on embryonic stem cell research? A pittance.

In California, biomedicine is number one, in terms of employment and solid, reliable business—it is time our political clout grew to match our true value.

Aerospace went to the moon on a mountain of political money—a man took a few steps across the sterile surface of the moon—and from that moonwalk came the computer industry.

If we want half a trillion dollars spent on the research, everybody in this room is going to have to be political—or allow the opponents of research to walk all over us as the current administration in Washington is doing right now.

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