Purchase the book Right to Recover

Right to Recover ~ Winning the Political and Religious Wars Over Stem Cell Research in America presents scientific facts that challenge readers to think for themselves rather than accept political or religious views on stem cell research.

www.nightengalepress.com


This book is available by request in bookstores nationwide.


RIGHT TO RECOVER is an Award-Winning Finalist in the Current Events: Political/Social of the National Best Books 2007 Awards. Amazon Best-selling book in biomedical category.


Friday, April 11, 2008

Step 24 of 24 Steps Toward Stem Cell Success

Across America and around the world, scientists are developing new ways to use embryonic stem cells to fight chronic disease and disability.

One widely-publicized advance is the development of “imitation” embryonic stem cells, the new Thomson/Yamanaka reprogrammed skin cells. But even if these new cells are proven completely successful, (which may take 10-15 years) that will not be the end of the struggle. We still need to know how to use the embryonic stem cells (from whatever source) and fulfill the motto of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine: “Turning stem cells into cures”.

Fortunately, the world is not waiting. Here are highlights of just a few recent advances. For more complete information, visit the excellent website, http://www.sciencedaily.com/, which has clear descriptions of the experiments, and citations for the source papers.

24. PATIENT-SPECIFIC CELL LINES SOUGHT: UC Irvine scientist Dr. Hans Keirstead is working on a huge problem with transplanting organs (like a liver, for example), which the body may reject it as foreign—and the patient dies. But if the replacement organ was grown from the patient’s own cells, it might be fully accepted, and function, and save the patient’s life. With the assistance of Gabriel Nistor, who designed their new work station at the Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center at UCI, Dr. Keirstead is working with highly purified embryonic stem cells, lasers, robotic instruments (for cell manipulation), and Somatic Nuclear Cell Transfer techniques to find new ways to help the body grow its own cure.

Don Reed
http://www.stemcellbattles.com/

Don C. Reed is co-chair of Californians for Cures, and writes for their web blog, www.stemcellbattles.com. Reed was citizen-sponsor for California’s Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act of 1999, named after his paralyzed son; he worked as a grassroots advocate for California’s Senator Deborah Ortiz’s three stem cell regulatory laws, served as an executive board member for Proposition 71, the California Stem Cells for Research and Cures Act, and is director of policy outreach for Americans for Cures. The retired schoolteacher is the author of five books and thirty magazine articles, and has received the National Press Award.

Thursday, April 10, 2008

Step 23 of 24 Steps Toward Stem Cell Success

Across America and around the world, scientists are developing new ways to use embryonic stem cells to fight chronic disease and disability.

One widely-publicized advance is the development of “imitation” embryonic stem cells, the new Thomson/Yamanaka reprogrammed skin cells. But even if these new cells are proven completely successful, (which may take 10-15 years) that will not be the end of the struggle. We still need to know how to use the embryonic stem cells (from whatever source) and fulfill the motto of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine: “Turning stem cells into cures”.

Fortunately, the world is not waiting. Here are highlights of just a few recent advances. For more complete information, visit the excellent website, http://www.sciencedaily.com/, which has clear descriptions of the experiments, and citations for the source papers.

23. NEW CELLS FOR BREATH: Anyone who has ever struggled to breathe has a hint of the agony of cystic fibrosis, (CF) the choking lung disease. Thanks to the pioneering work of men and women like Rick Wetsel, Eva Zsigmond, and C. Thomas Caskey, CF may be on the way out. At the University of Texas, these scientists have used ESCs to create a transplantable source of new and healthy breathing cells.

Don Reed
http://www.stemcellbattles.com/

Don C. Reed is co-chair of Californians for Cures, and writes for their web blog, www.stemcellbattles.com. Reed was citizen-sponsor for California’s Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act of 1999, named after his paralyzed son; he worked as a grassroots advocate for California’s Senator Deborah Ortiz’s three stem cell regulatory laws, served as an executive board member for Proposition 71, the California Stem Cells for Research and Cures Act, and is director of policy outreach for Americans for Cures. The retired schoolteacher is the author of five books and thirty magazine articles, and has received the National Press Award.

Wednesday, April 9, 2008

Step 22 of 24 Steps Toward Stem Cell Success

Across America and around the world, scientists are developing new ways to use embryonic stem cells to fight chronic disease and disability.

One widely-publicized advance is the development of “imitation” embryonic stem cells, the new Thomson/Yamanaka reprogrammed skin cells. But even if these new cells are proven completely successful, (which may take 10-15 years) that will not be the end of the struggle. We still need to know how to use the embryonic stem cells (from whatever source) and fulfill the motto of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine: “Turning stem cells into cures”.

Fortunately, the world is not waiting. Here are highlights of just a few recent advances. For more complete information, visit the excellent website, http://www.sciencedaily.com/, which has clear descriptions of the experiments, and citations for the source papers.

22. SEAWEED FOR STEM CELLS? At Australia’s University of New South Wales, seaweed (algae) may prove useful for both the new IPS (skin reprogramming) and original embryonic stem cell techniques. Micro-encapsulating the stem cells in a sort of seaweed wrap, the scientists hope to prevent the growth of tumors, while still allowing the stem cells to differentiate and function properly. Led by UNSW Professor Bernie Tuch of the Diabetes Transplant Unit, both mouse and human embryonic stem cells were used, the latter provided by Dr. Kuldip Sidhu. (The micro-encapsulation process was previously used in a non-embryonic project, the Seaweed Diabetes Pilot Trial, transplanting insulin-producing cells from donor humans to insulin-needing people, a human trial currently underway.)

Don Reed
http://www.stemcellbattles.com/

Don C. Reed is co-chair of Californians for Cures, and writes for their web blog, www.stemcellbattles.com. Reed was citizen-sponsor for California’s Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act of 1999, named after his paralyzed son; he worked as a grassroots advocate for California’s Senator Deborah Ortiz’s three stem cell regulatory laws, served as an executive board member for Proposition 71, the California Stem Cells for Research and Cures Act, and is director of policy outreach for Americans for Cures. The retired schoolteacher is the author of five books and thirty magazine articles, and has received the National Press Award.

Tuesday, April 8, 2008

Step 21 of 24 Steps Toward Stem Cell Success

Across America and around the world, scientists are developing new ways to use embryonic stem cells to fight chronic disease and disability.

One widely-publicized advance is the development of “imitation” embryonic stem cells, the new Thomson/Yamanaka reprogrammed skin cells. But even if these new cells are proven completely successful, (which may take 10-15 years) that will not be the end of the struggle. We still need to know how to use the embryonic stem cells (from whatever source) and fulfill the motto of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine: “Turning stem cells into cures”.

Fortunately, the world is not waiting. Here are highlights of just a few recent advances. For more complete information, visit the excellent website, http://www.sciencedaily.com/, which has clear descriptions of the experiments, and citations for the source papers.

21. HEALING A FRACTURED SKULL: What if there was a way for even terribly broken skulls to grow back together? Johns Hopkins scientists Nathaniel S. Hwang, Jennifer Elisseeff and others have developed a new way to grow bone. Taking cells isolated from embryonic stem cells, the investigators let them grow on a framework, or scaffold, itself made of living materials, which would dissolve when no longer needed.

Don Reed
http://www.stemcellbattles.com/

Don C. Reed is co-chair of Californians for Cures, and writes for their web blog, www.stemcellbattles.com. Reed was citizen-sponsor for California’s Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act of 1999, named after his paralyzed son; he worked as a grassroots advocate for California’s Senator Deborah Ortiz’s three stem cell regulatory laws, served as an executive board member for Proposition 71, the California Stem Cells for Research and Cures Act, and is director of policy outreach for Americans for Cures. The retired schoolteacher is the author of five books and thirty magazine articles, and has received the National Press Award.

Monday, April 7, 2008

Step 20 of 24 Steps Toward Stem Cell Success

Across America and around the world, scientists are developing new ways to use embryonic stem cells to fight chronic disease and disability.

One widely-publicized advance is the development of “imitation” embryonic stem cells, the new Thomson/Yamanaka reprogrammed skin cells. But even if these new cells are proven completely successful, (which may take 10-15 years) that will not be the end of the struggle. We still need to know how to use the embryonic stem cells (from whatever source) and fulfill the motto of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine: “Turning stem cells into cures”.

Fortunately, the world is not waiting. Here are highlights of just a few recent advances. For more complete information, visit the excellent website, http://www.sciencedaily.com/, which has clear descriptions of the experiments, and citations for the source papers.

20. SOCKS OR A T-SHIRT--ALL STEM CELL LINES NOT THE SAME: The Bush Administration’s restrictions limit federal funding to 78 lines, of which only about 20 are actually useful and available. If embryonic stem cell lines were identical, this miniscule number might be enough. However, UCLA biologist Yi Sun and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator Thomas Sudhof of the University of Texas compared just two of the Presidentially-approved lines, and found them different in important ways. Cells derived from one line tended to fit one side of the brain, while a second line worked best on the other side. This difference is important: like reaching in the sock drawer and getting a T-shirt instead. Many stem cell lines are needed, so investigators can find exactly what is needed.

Don Reed
http://www.stemcellbattles.com/

Don C. Reed is co-chair of Californians for Cures, and writes for their web blog, www.stemcellbattles.com. Reed was citizen-sponsor for California’s Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act of 1999, named after his paralyzed son; he worked as a grassroots advocate for California’s Senator Deborah Ortiz’s three stem cell regulatory laws, served as an executive board member for Proposition 71, the California Stem Cells for Research and Cures Act, and is director of policy outreach for Americans for Cures. The retired schoolteacher is the author of five books and thirty magazine articles, and has received the National Press Award.

Saturday, April 5, 2008

Documentary on Stem Cell Research

Have you checked out the Wisconsin Stem Cell Now, Inc. web page lately? There have been many additions lately, including the addition of a blog where you can comment on news and developments. Take a look, and check back regularly for more changes as we continue to revamp the site and make it more user friendly.

Also, be on the lookout for a documentary on stem cell research that will be screened at the Wisconsin Film Festival. The film, Mapping Stem Cell

Research-- Terra Incognita, puts a human face on stem cell research and explores the immense legal, moral, and ethical issues surrounding advances in medical research. You can read more about the film at www.stemcellfilm.com. The film will screen in Madison at the Wisconsin Film Festival on Sunday April 6th at 11:15am.

Many of you have no doubt heard that Madison will be the site of the World Stem Cell Summit this coming September 22-23. Look to the website for more information as it becomes available. We are hoping that Wisconsin Stem Cell Now will play a role in this gathering of leading researchers and policy experts from across the nation.

Ed Fallone
President
Wisconsin Stem Cell Now, Inc.
www.wistemcellnow.org

Friday, April 4, 2008

Step 19 of 24 Steps Toward Stem Cell Success

Across America and around the world, scientists are developing new ways to use embryonic stem cells to fight chronic disease and disability.

One widely-publicized advance is the development of “imitation” embryonic stem cells, the new Thomson/Yamanaka reprogrammed skin cells. But even if these new cells are proven completely successful, (which may take 10-15 years) that will not be the end of the struggle. We still need to know how to use the embryonic stem cells (from whatever source) and fulfill the motto of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine: “Turning stem cells into cures”.

Fortunately, the world is not waiting. Here are highlights of just a few recent advances. For more complete information, visit the excellent website, http://www.sciencedaily.com/, which has clear descriptions of the experiments, and citations for the source papers.

19. NEW KNEES FOR OLD: Athletes and non-athletes alike suffer when their knees wear out. The body cannot re-grow the cartilage cushion in the joints. At Rice University, however, researcher Kyriacos A. Athanasiou has developed a new method to make cartilage-like cells from human embryonic stem cells.

Don C. Reed is co-chair of Californians for Cures, and writes for their web blog, www.stemcellbattles.com. Reed was citizen-sponsor for California’s Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act of 1999, named after his paralyzed son; he worked as a grassroots advocate for California’s Senator Deborah Ortiz’s three stem cell regulatory laws, served as an executive board member for Proposition 71, the California Stem Cells for Research and Cures Act, and is director of policy outreach for Americans for Cures. The retired schoolteacher is the author of five books and thirty magazine articles, and has received the National Press Award.

Thursday, April 3, 2008

Step 18 of 24 Steps Toward Stem Cell Success

Across America and around the world, scientists are developing new ways to use embryonic stem cells to fight chronic disease and disability.

One widely-publicized advance is the development of “imitation” embryonic stem cells, the new Thomson/Yamanaka reprogrammed skin cells. But even if these new cells are proven completely successful, (which may take 10-15 years) that will not be the end of the struggle. We still need to know how to use the embryonic stem cells (from whatever source) and fulfill the motto of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine: “Turning stem cells into cures”.

Fortunately, the world is not waiting. Here are highlights of just a few recent advances. For more complete information, visit the excellent website, http://www.sciencedaily.com/, which has clear descriptions of the experiments, and citations for the source papers.

18. MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY TAKES A HIT: Called incurable, muscular dystrophy wastes away the body’s muscles, a slow but inexorable crippling. But at the University of Texas, Dr. Rita Perlingeira’s research team used ESC research to make formerly wasted muscles function. A gene (PAX 3) found in embryonic stem cells was injected into the lab rats non-functioning leg muscles—which began to work again.

Don Reed
http://www.stemcellbattles.com/

Don C. Reed is co-chair of Californians for Cures, and writes for their web blog, www.stemcellbattles.com. Reed was citizen-sponsor for California’s Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act of 1999, named after his paralyzed son; he worked as a grassroots advocate for California’s Senator Deborah Ortiz’s three stem cell regulatory laws, served as an executive board member for Proposition 71, the California Stem Cells for Research and Cures Act, and is director of policy outreach for Americans for Cures. The retired schoolteacher is the author of five books and thirty magazine articles, and has received the National Press Award.

Wednesday, April 2, 2008

Step 17 of 24 Steps Toward Stem Cell Success

Across America and around the world, scientists are developing new ways to use embryonic stem cells to fight chronic disease and disability.

One widely-publicized advance is the development of “imitation” embryonic stem cells, the new Thomson/Yamanaka reprogrammed skin cells. But even if these new cells are proven completely successful, (which may take 10-15 years) that will not be the end of the struggle. We still need to know how to use the embryonic stem cells (from whatever source) and fulfill the motto of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine: “Turning stem cells into cures”.

Fortunately, the world is not waiting. Here are highlights of just a few recent advances. For more complete information, visit the excellent website, http://www.sciencedaily.com/, which has clear descriptions of the experiments, and citations for the source papers.

17. MODELING MONSTERS: ISOLATING LOU GEHRIG’S DISEASE: In the terrible disease ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease), motor nerves break down. But do the nerves fail because of a problem inside the cells or outside them? Scientists Kevin Eggan of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and Serge Przedborski of Columbia University Medical Center, used embryonic stem cells to make a microscopic model of ALS, to learn how the disease develops, and which drugs may be useful to defeat it. Using their own new model, these champion scientists saw that a non-nerve cell called an astrocyte may be a poisonous part of the problem.

Don Reed
http://www.stemcellbattles.com/

Don C. Reed is co-chair of Californians for Cures, and writes for their web blog, www.stemcellbattles.com. Reed was citizen-sponsor for California’s Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act of 1999, named after his paralyzed son; he worked as a grassroots advocate for California’s Senator Deborah Ortiz’s three stem cell regulatory laws, served as an executive board member for Proposition 71, the California Stem Cells for Research and Cures Act, and is director of policy outreach for Americans for Cures. The retired schoolteacher is the author of five books and thirty magazine articles, and has received the National Press Award.

Tuesday, April 1, 2008

Step 16 of 24 Steps Toward Stem Cell Success

Across America and around the world, scientists are developing new ways to use embryonic stem cells to fight chronic disease and disability.

One widely-publicized advance is the development of “imitation” embryonic stem cells, the new Thomson/Yamanaka reprogrammed skin cells. But even if these new cells are proven completely successful, (which may take 10-15 years) that will not be the end of the struggle. We still need to know how to use the embryonic stem cells (from whatever source) and fulfill the motto of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine: “Turning stem cells into cures”.

Fortunately, the world is not waiting. Here are highlights of just a few recent advances. For more complete information, visit the excellent website, http://www.sciencedaily.com/, which has clear descriptions of the experiments, and citations for the source papers.

16. COUPLES WILLING TO DONATE UNUSED BLASTOCYSTS: It was once thought that almost no couples involved in In-Vitro Fertility procedures would be willing to donate their left over blastocysts to stem cell research. A new study from Duke University and Johns Hopkins shows just the opposite. At the Berman Institute of Bioethics, Dr. Ruth Faden and Anne Lyerly found that a large majority (60 percent) of infertility patients would prefer to help the new research, rather than discarding, storing, or giving their unused blastocysts to other couples (22% preferred this option).

Don Reed
http://www.stemcellbattles.com/

Don C. Reed is co-chair of Californians for Cures, and writes for their web blog, www.stemcellbattles.com. Reed was citizen-sponsor for California’s Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act of 1999, named after his paralyzed son; he worked as a grassroots advocate for California’s Senator Deborah Ortiz’s three stem cell regulatory laws, served as an executive board member for Proposition 71, the California Stem Cells for Research and Cures Act, and is director of policy outreach for Americans for Cures. The retired schoolteacher is the author of five books and thirty magazine articles, and has received the National Press Award.